Maudie At Home

Film Review: Maudie

Maudie, Aisling Walsh’s biopic of Canadian folk artist Maud Lewis, is an unpretentious and inspiring film. Sally Hawkins does not play Maud so much as disappear into her. Ethan Hawke gives a strong performance as her husband Everett. Screenwriter Sherry White provides a touching love story about two people Maud describes as a “pair of odd socks”. Walsh and White are not in a hurry to reveal the cause of Maud’s health problems (rheumatoid arthritis, dating from childhood). They concentrat[Read more]
My Left Foot Christy Beard

Film Appreciation: My Left Foot

“I saw it as more than a rather grim story of a man in a wheelchair. Christy represented for me a real kind of heroism, and I really wanted to try to capture the rage and frustration that led him to paint and write. To show, I suppose, that the trap is not the wheelchair or the afflictions, but our attitude to disabled people.” Daniel Day-Lewis On His Role In My Left Foot, To Arena Magazine, Summer-Autumn 1989 Jim Sheridan’s My Left Foot shows bleak real-life events, but the film itself is[Read more]
Frida Cheers

Art Overcomes Adversity: List For Week Ending June 25, 2017

Our films this week deal with artists who produce their work despite adversity, often in the form of a health condition. This is not intended as an all-inclusive list. Reader suggestions are welcome. If you know an addition to this list, please write using the comments below. Maudie (2016) (Reviewed In Thinking Cinema 6/23/17) http://www.thinkingcinema.com/film-review-maudie/ My Left Foot (1989) (Article In Thinking Cinema 6/23/17) http://www.thinkingcinema.com/film-appreciation-my-left-foot[Read more]
Farewell To Europe Brazil

Film Review: Stefan Zweig: Farewell To Europe

Ordinarily, I would not recommend Googling the subject of a biopic prior to seeing the film. In the case of Stefan Zweig: Farewell To Europe, I have to make an exception. Director/writer Maria Schrader and co-writer Jan Schomburg operate under the assumption that viewers are already familiar with Zweig’s life. Expending work to piece together the relevant details together may distract viewers from this visually striking and thought-provoking film. And that would be a shame. Farewell To Europe[Read more]
Letter From An Unknown Woman 3rd

Film Appreciation: Letter To An Unknown Woman

PLOT SPOILERS THROUGHOUT Letter From An Unknown Woman (1948) is worth seeing because it shows a group of talented individuals-Max Ophuls, Howard Koch, Franz Planer and Alexander Golitzen among them-at the top of their form. Honesty compels me to add that the story, adapted from the Stefan Zweig novel of the same name, requires considerable suspension of disbelief. This is a sound film with a silent film scenario. The opening scenes function as a framing device. Stefan (Louis Jourdan) is a former[Read more]
Classics are still being made

Film Review: Maudie

Film Review: Maudie

Maudie, Aisling Walsh’s biopic of Canadian folk artist Maud Lewis, is an unpretentious and inspiring film. Sally Hawkins does not play Maud so much as disappear into her. Ethan Hawke gives a strong performance as her husband Everett. Screenwriter Sherry White provides a touching love story about two people Maud describes as a “pair ofContinue Reading

Film Appreciation: My Left Foot

Film Appreciation: My Left Foot

“I saw it as more than a rather grim story of a man in a wheelchair. Christy represented for me a real kind of heroism, and I really wanted to try to capture the rage and frustration that led him to paint and write. To show, I suppose, that the trap is not the wheelchairContinue Reading

Art Overcomes Adversity: List For Week Ending June 25, 2017

Art Overcomes Adversity: List For Week Ending June 25, 2017

Our films this week deal with artists who produce their work despite adversity, often in the form of a health condition. This is not intended as an all-inclusive list. Reader suggestions are welcome. If you know an addition to this list, please write using the comments below. Maudie (2016) (Reviewed In Thinking Cinema 6/23/17) http://www.thinkingcinema.com/film-review-maudie/ MyContinue Reading

Film Review: Stefan Zweig: Farewell To Europe

Film Review: Stefan Zweig: Farewell To Europe

Ordinarily, I would not recommend Googling the subject of a biopic prior to seeing the film. In the case of Stefan Zweig: Farewell To Europe, I have to make an exception. Director/writer Maria Schrader and co-writer Jan Schomburg operate under the assumption that viewers are already familiar with Zweig’s life. Expending work to piece togetherContinue Reading

Film Appreciation: Letter To An Unknown Woman

Film Appreciation: Letter To An Unknown Woman

PLOT SPOILERS THROUGHOUT Letter From An Unknown Woman (1948) is worth seeing because it shows a group of talented individuals-Max Ophuls, Howard Koch, Franz Planer and Alexander Golitzen among them-at the top of their form. Honesty compels me to add that the story, adapted from the Stefan Zweig novel of the same name, requires considerableContinue Reading

Film Review: My Cousin Rachel

Film Review: My Cousin Rachel

Good looks only go so far Roger Michell’s adaptation of Daphne Du Maurier’s My Cousin Rachel is easier to admire than like. The film is quite impressive from a technical standpoint. Mike Eley’s cinematography, Kristina Hetherington’s editing, Rael Jones’ music, and Alice Normington’s production design are all top-notch. Rachel Weisz and Sam Claflin give strongContinue Reading

Film Appreciation: Don’t Look Now

Film Appreciation: Don’t Look Now

“Nothing is what it seems.” John Baxter This line, spoken casually in the opening minutes of Don’t Look Now (1973), almost serve as a tip-off to the audience. Very little in Nicolas Roeg’s film can be taken at face value, or understood in isolation. John (Donald Sutherland) is a professional restorer of buildings. At theContinue Reading